Posts Tagged ‘copyright’

LG Manual Details Piracy…

February 8, 2010

LG may well find itself in some trouble with studios after its user manuals were found to contain details of how to watch illegally downloaded material on LG’s hardware.

Seems like a bit of a misstep...

The whole kafuffle stems from the release of a line of HDTV’s from LG that boast USB ports, allowing users to plug external storage directly into their displays and watch any content that they’ve got stored on those drives directly on their LG TV. Of course, the assumption might be that such content has been legally obtained, but LG’s own manual doesn’t seem too fussy, showing pirated content in its diagrams of the functionality.

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iTunes to Move into the Cloud?

January 21, 2010

The latest piece of speculation courtesy of the current press-obsession with Apple is that the company could move elements of its iTunes service into the ever-nebulous “cloud.” Still, there’s more to this one than most.

It seems as though Apple is on a bit of a roll at the moment, with the world and its mother speculating on just what it is, could be or might one day build or offer through its existing services. While most of the buzz has been around the upcoming tablet offering, there’s also a lot around the iPhone’s rumoured new OS, the latest from the Wall Street Journal indicates something of a shift in the established iTunes model.

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YouTube Launches Music Service

January 21, 2010

YouTube has launched its own Music Discovery service, for want of a better description, boasting the heading “Find > Mix > Watch.”

YouTube’s new service, which you can find fairly simply by heading over to YouTube.com/disco. For now, it all seems fairly straightforward, all you need to do is drop a name into the “Artist” box and YouTube works some kind of behind-the-scenes witchcraft and comes back to you with, on the right hand side, a list of songs to listen to by that artist. However, it’s the left hand side that’s really interesting.

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Microsoft Downplays Google’s China Stance

January 15, 2010

Microsoft and Hewlett Packard’s executives have both admitted that they won’t be backing Google’s stance in China, after it revealed this week that it had been the target of a major attack.

Despite Google having received word of support from both Yahoo and the White House when it announced that it would no longer be censoring content on its Chinese services, Microsoft and HP have both gone in the opposite direction. Indeed, according to the Financial Times, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer essentially admitted that China was a big enough market to be worth the headaches.

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France to Disconnect Illegal Downloaders

January 4, 2010

France’s controversial new law covering the disconnection of internet users found to be guilty of illegally downloading copyrighted material is now in effect.

The Pirate Bay's logo remains the go-to image for piracy news ;)

According to the BBC’s article on the law, those who are found to be illegally downloading content will initially be sent an email to warn them to cease their illicit activities. Those who continue to flaunt the law will be sent a plain-old snail-mail letter to inform them of their position. Should that fail to convince users to stop downloading, they’ll be brought before a judge and face either a fine or potential disconnection.

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Google Loses Against Groovle

December 31, 2009

Google took its case against Groovle to an arbitration board, which ruled that Google and Groovle are different enough not to cause the confusion that Google is worried about.

According to the Register Google took its case to the National Arbitration Forum, a body that has long been considered the people to talk to if you’re in trouble with similar domain names. The National Arbitration Forum ruled that Google’s complaint, that Groovle is “confusingly similar” to Google, wasn’t a valid one. Indeed, the whole thing quickly devolves into fairly open comedy from that point.

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Top 10 Illegally Downloaded Movies of 2009

December 21, 2009

While there will always be awards and ceremonies, there are all kinds of ways to see what the top movies of any given year were, not least of which the movies that have been pirated the most.

TorrentFreak has posted a list of the top ten most pirated movies of this year, and while we’ve seen some fairly massive releases over the course of the year, you might be interested to see what did and what didn’t make the big list. So, while the critics are sure to have already decided what the best films of this year were, the list of the top ten most pirated movies is a very democratic one… though those in the movie industry would likely estimate it to be a democracy of thieves.

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Record Labels to Pay $6 Billion for Pirating Music

December 8, 2009

It seems that piracy lawsuits are a gate that swings both ways with Warner, Sony BMG, EMI and Universal now facing some fairly hefty bills to remunerate artists whose content, it seems, they’ve pirated.

Usually we tend not to see what happens on the far side of the table, with most of the media attention surrounding record labels and piracy centred quite firmly on the poor souls dragged into court by apparently merciless megapulishers, but now we’re told that record labels are facing the fairly substantial sum of $6 billion in damages to be paid to artists they’re found guilty of pirating roughly 300,000 tracks from.

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The Pirate Bay Gets Tougher

November 30, 2009

In a genuinely bizarre turn of events, it seems as though renewed attempts to have file sharing haven and practical Mos Eisley of the internet, The Pirate Bay, shut down have pushed the site into a position where it could be impossible to do so.

There’s a very lengthy write-up of the history leading to the most changes to the Pirate Bay’s structure over at TorrentFreak, but the long and short of it is that the fact that the Pirate Bay no longer boasts its own tracker could well have done an awful lot to shake up the cases against the illegal filesharing service. For one, it could well mean that the current cases being fought in Sweden don’t mean quite as much, with the site in question now entirely outside of Sweden.

Repeated attempts to disconnect the Pirate Bay have seen the site move around so much, geographically, that it was eventually carried out of its home country. Those individuals behind the Pirate Bay itself are now quite a bit outside of Sweden’s jurisdiction, with Frederik Neij safely holed up in Thailand while Gottfrid Svartholm is, apparently, spending his time in Cambodia.

Neij was good enough to comment on the current situation of the Pirate Bay last week when he said that,

“I am wondering if Swedish law has the power to issue a prohibition or penalty against a website in another country and my adopted acts in another country with a website that does not exist in Sweden.”

Certainly, it’s an interesting question, but the fact is that there’s an awful lot of money behind the case against the Pirate Bay, and it seems entirely likely that the case will be pursued as far as it possibly can be. Still, the whole thing is very interesting, given the lengths to which the copyright holders involved have gone to in shutting down the whole thing down.

For those interested in reading (an awful lot) more on the topic, the TorrentFreak article on the current state of the Pirate Bay has much more detail.


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