Pirates Spend More On Music?

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Results of a recent survey have shown that pirates, that is to say, those who the music industry has effectively been witch-hunting, actually turn out to spend more money than most on music.

Pirate Bay

According to The Independent the results of the survey suggest that those guilty of infringing copyright by downloading music illegally spend an average of £77 (or €85) on music every year, while those who claim never to download music illegally spend around the £44 (or €48) mark. Moreover, the survey hit a wide audience, with 1,000 people aged between 16 and 50 responding.

It’s interesting to see the figures from respondents, though it seems very likely that the music industry and copyright holders will question these findings (and very likely the honesty of respondents). Still, its enough to make us question the recent policy shift to expose those guilty of repeated piracy to internet disconnection.

Still, this is more evidence for those who have been arguing that music piracy does, in its own strange way, help the music industry by allowing for music to reach a wider audience.

That said, we imagine it’s not all that likely that this news will change any copyright holders minds on the evils of music piracy. It’s far more likely that they’ll stay the course and continue with costly litigation and internet disconnection…

If you’re interested in reading about the survey in more detail then it’s well worth checking out The Independent’s piece on illegal music downloaders and how much they spend on music.

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