Posts Tagged ‘Piracy’

LG Manual Details Piracy…

February 8, 2010

LG may well find itself in some trouble with studios after its user manuals were found to contain details of how to watch illegally downloaded material on LG’s hardware.

Seems like a bit of a misstep...

The whole kafuffle stems from the release of a line of HDTV’s from LG that boast USB ports, allowing users to plug external storage directly into their displays and watch any content that they’ve got stored on those drives directly on their LG TV. Of course, the assumption might be that such content has been legally obtained, but LG’s own manual doesn’t seem too fussy, showing pirated content in its diagrams of the functionality.

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PlayStation 3 Hack Released

January 27, 2010

It seems that the recently revealed hack for Sony’s PlayStation 3 has now been released to the web at large through the medium of the hacker, George “Geohot” Hotz’, blog.

With many questioning the veracity of Hotz’ claim that he had managed to hack the PlayStation 3, or simply to what extent that hack might be useful, it seems that the most sensible move would be to simply release the hack into the wild and see just what the community at large can do with it. Still, it’s well worth keeping in mind that this is the same man who originally managed to hack the iPhone.

Perhaps the most detailed (without being so complex as to be practically incomprehensible) writeup on the first exploit to hit the PS3 has come from Eurogamer.net, which quickly points out that,

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Mass Effect 2 Sees Vast Pre-Release Piracy

January 26, 2010

It seems that Bioware’s upcoming sequel to its hit science-fiction RPG, Mass Effect, has been leaked to bittorrent sites, with many users rushing to illegally download the game before its release.

Mass Effect feels the mass downloading effect 😦

Word comes via TorrentFreak of the leak, which has apparently resulted in an inordinate amount of illegal downloads. Indeed, the figure was initially reported to be “more than 300,000” to be somewhere in the process of downloading or having already downloaded the game illegally. This is thanks, in no small part, to the fact that the first Mass Effect game managed to win such critical acclaim for itself.

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Internet Pirates Move Further Afield

January 5, 2010

It seems that internet pirates have started to move away from countries in which they might be prosecuted, setting up shop in far-flung regions in an attempt to avoid persistent litigation.

Sweden was, for a very long time indeed, host to The Pirate Bay, which became practically iconic for its flaunting of copyright law within Europe. However, after it lost the case brought against it by representatives of the various media publishers losing money because of it, The Pirate Bay hopped from one location to another in a bid to stay open, a move that’s been aped by other major filesharers. Indeed, there’s a bit of a trend among some of the major illegal filesharing operations when it comes to shifting to places they’re less likely to be prosecuted.

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France to Disconnect Illegal Downloaders

January 4, 2010

France’s controversial new law covering the disconnection of internet users found to be guilty of illegally downloading copyrighted material is now in effect.

The Pirate Bay's logo remains the go-to image for piracy news 😉

According to the BBC’s article on the law, those who are found to be illegally downloading content will initially be sent an email to warn them to cease their illicit activities. Those who continue to flaunt the law will be sent a plain-old snail-mail letter to inform them of their position. Should that fail to convince users to stop downloading, they’ll be brought before a judge and face either a fine or potential disconnection.

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eBook Piracy Worries Publishers

January 4, 2010

It seems that the trend towards the adoption of ebook readers has some book publishers worried over the possibility that their content will see illegal piracy on the rise.

Word comes via TorrentFreak that, despite the general lack of bestselling authors in the list of the top 25 most pirated books last year, many publishers seem to fear the ease with which their content might be distributed illegally for the ebook reader-enabled population. Indeed, as a result of their generally small size once digitised, book publishers could potentially have more to fear from piracy than publishers of more data-heavy media.

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Modern Warfare 2 Sees Massive Piracy

December 30, 2009

The latest addition to the Call of Duty series, the record breakingly popular Modern Warfare 2, has managed to become the most illegally pirated game of 2009, despite being released so late this year.

The fact that Modern Warfare 2 has topped the list of games being pirated this year should come as no surprise given the massive hype leading up to the game’s launch and the almost undiluted praise of its multiplayer, to say nothing of its record breaking launch. Still, those involved will be disappointed with the news, especially given the lengths to which the developers behind Modern Warfare 2, Infinity Ward, had gone to prevent illegal piracy.

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Record Labels to Pay $6 Billion for Pirating Music

December 8, 2009

It seems that piracy lawsuits are a gate that swings both ways with Warner, Sony BMG, EMI and Universal now facing some fairly hefty bills to remunerate artists whose content, it seems, they’ve pirated.

Usually we tend not to see what happens on the far side of the table, with most of the media attention surrounding record labels and piracy centred quite firmly on the poor souls dragged into court by apparently merciless megapulishers, but now we’re told that record labels are facing the fairly substantial sum of $6 billion in damages to be paid to artists they’re found guilty of pirating roughly 300,000 tracks from.

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The Pirate Bay Gets Tougher

November 30, 2009

In a genuinely bizarre turn of events, it seems as though renewed attempts to have file sharing haven and practical Mos Eisley of the internet, The Pirate Bay, shut down have pushed the site into a position where it could be impossible to do so.

There’s a very lengthy write-up of the history leading to the most changes to the Pirate Bay’s structure over at TorrentFreak, but the long and short of it is that the fact that the Pirate Bay no longer boasts its own tracker could well have done an awful lot to shake up the cases against the illegal filesharing service. For one, it could well mean that the current cases being fought in Sweden don’t mean quite as much, with the site in question now entirely outside of Sweden.

Repeated attempts to disconnect the Pirate Bay have seen the site move around so much, geographically, that it was eventually carried out of its home country. Those individuals behind the Pirate Bay itself are now quite a bit outside of Sweden’s jurisdiction, with Frederik Neij safely holed up in Thailand while Gottfrid Svartholm is, apparently, spending his time in Cambodia.

Neij was good enough to comment on the current situation of the Pirate Bay last week when he said that,

“I am wondering if Swedish law has the power to issue a prohibition or penalty against a website in another country and my adopted acts in another country with a website that does not exist in Sweden.”

Certainly, it’s an interesting question, but the fact is that there’s an awful lot of money behind the case against the Pirate Bay, and it seems entirely likely that the case will be pursued as far as it possibly can be. Still, the whole thing is very interesting, given the lengths to which the copyright holders involved have gone to in shutting down the whole thing down.

For those interested in reading (an awful lot) more on the topic, the TorrentFreak article on the current state of the Pirate Bay has much more detail.